Search This Blog

Translate

Facebook

Wednesday, 8 April 2020

Economic Justice and Global Political Trends: Framing the Fight over Populism

EPISODE 90

Economic Justice and Global Political Trends:
Framing the Fight over Populism


In this podcast, Dr. Shana Marshall frames global discussions on populist trends in the Middle East and North Africa. Dr. Marshall argues that populism is an articulation of global capitalism that is marked by an anti-elite sentiment and a class-based ideology. She considers that the rise of populism is due to the difficulty of dismantling the bureaucratic and professional structures that keep the “ultra-rich” protected. Dr. Marshall explains that, by putting the burden on the poor to change their situation rather than slowing  down the engine of accumulation, these structures recreate the conditions leading to populism.

Shana Marshall is Associate Director of the Institute for Middle East Studies and Assistant Research Faculty member at the George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.  She earned her PhD in International Relations and Comparative Politics of the Middle East at the University of Maryland in 2012. Her dissertation, “The New Politics of Patronage: The Arms Trade and Clientelism in the Arab World” (forthcoming, Columbia University Press) examines how Middle East governments use arms sales agreements to channel financial resources and economic privileges to domestic pro-regime elites.


This podcast is part of the Contemporary Thought series and was recorded on November 5,2019 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).


Download the Podcast: Feed / iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Wednesday, 1 April 2020

France's Shattered Empire: Fascism and Republicanism in Colonial Tunisia, 1931-1944

EPISODE 89

France's Shattered Empire: 

Fascism and Republicanism in Colonial Tunisia,  1931-1944


In this podcast, Luke Sebastian Scalone, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at Northeastern University, discusses his research project on “France's Shattered Empire: Fascism and Republicanism in Colonial Tunisia, 1931-1944.”

In the midst of the ideological upheaval of the global 1930s, fascist movements developed in countries as wide ranging as France, Romania, Spain, and Sweden.  However, European fascist movements did not limit their activities to Europe itself. Rather, they spread across colonial empires, establishing roots far from the centers of imperial metropoles. In this project, Luke Scalone examines the Fédération Tunisienne du Parti Populaire Français (PPF), an organization led by French settlers that could veritably be called “fascist,” in colonial Tunisia. Scalone argues that there were two mobilizing factors of the PPF in Tunisia: concerns about Italian fascist claims over Tunisia, and the rapid development of Habib Bourguiba’s Neo-Destour. These same concerns would, in 1940, push the colonial administration of Tunisia to rally to the pseudo-fascist Vichy France. Due to its opposition to Italian claims, the Fédération Tunisienne du PPF offers an interesting case study into two fascist movements who were combative against one another, suggesting that nationalism was a much stronger point of identification than shared fascist values.

This interview was led by CEMAT Associate Director, Dr. Meriem Guetat, and was recorded on July 16, 2019, at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).


Download the Podcast: Feed / iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Monday, 30 March 2020

Rencontre autour de l’ouvrage : La scientificité de l’empirisme en sociologie

ÉPISODE 88 

RENCONTRE AUTOUR DE L'OUVRAGE: 

LA SCIENTIFICITÉ DE L'EMPIRISME EN SOCIOLOGIE


Cet ouvrage collectif, qui réunit plusieurs auteurs, est le résultat des actes d’une journée d’étude qui s’est tenue le 18 octobre 2015 à l’université de Bejaïa consacrée à La méthodologie : conceptions et pratiques et au cours de laquelle l’on a eu à débattre des différentes pratiques de la méthodologie. Les textes présentés ici ont fait corps d’idées débattues, proposées et parfois opposées, mettant au jour la diversité des paradigmes que pose la problématique de la recherche dans tous ses états : épistémologique, théorique et empirique. 

Les contributions des auteurs, au nombre de neuf, s’articulent en trois parties : la première traite de la problématisation de l’objet d’étude. La deuxième s’interroge sur l’expérimentation et la rationalité effective. La troisième se penche sur la pluralité des techniques et l’objectivité d’investigation.

Abdel-Halim Berretima est professeur de sociologie à l’Université de Bejaïa (Algérie) et membre associé de l’Institut interdisciplinaire sur les enjeux sociaux, sciences sociales, politiques et santé (L’IRIS), EHESS, Paris. Fondateur du master sociologie de la santé et du doctorat sociologie de la santé et du travail à la faculté des Sciences humaines et sociales (Université de Bejaïa), ses recherches portent sur la santé publique, la santé au travail, l’immigration et la ville. 

Ont collaboré à ce volume: Abdel-Halim Berretima (Bejaïa), Jean-Yves Causer (Mulhouse), Gisèle Dambyant-Wargny (Paris), Gilles Ferréol (Besançon), Rachid Hamadouche (Alger), Smaïn Laacher (Strasbourg), Abdelkader Lakjaa (Oran), Madani Safar Zitoun (Alger), Tassadit Yacine (Paris).

Cette rencontre a été organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA). Elle a eu lieu le 20 février 2020 au CEMA, Oran. Pr. Abdelkader Lakjaa, Sociologue à l'Université d'Oran 2 a modéré le débat.


Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed / iTunes / Podbean

Nous remercions Dr. Jonathan Glasser, anthropologue culturel au College of William & Mary, pour son istikhbar in sika à l'alto pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Thursday, 5 March 2020

Building Habitat: The Atelier des Bâtisseurs in North Africa and Beyond

EPISODE 87

Building Habitat: The Atelier des Bâtisseurs in North Africa and Beyond


In this podcast, Johanna Sluiter, PhD Candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts  at New York University, discusses the building habitat: The Atelier des Bâtisseurs in North Africa and Beyond.

In 1949, the Atelier des Bâtisseurs (ATBAT) founded their first overseas bureau in Tangiers, Morocco. Having split with their mentor, Le Corbusier, and garnered worldwide attention for their first building site, the Unité d’Habitation in Marseille, ATBAT sought to expand its practice beyond France by establishing ATBAT-Afrique, before embarking upon future plans for ATBAT-Orient and ATBAT-Amérique, to be installed in Beirut and New York, respectively. This initial work abroad would therefore serve as both a critical test and potential catalyst for the young multinational, multidisciplinary firm. It would demonstrate the ability (or lack thereof) of European-trained architects to respond to contexts defined by radically new cultures, climates, and clients than they had previously addressed or even considered, and would articulate their idea of ‘habitat’ – a comprehensive framework for universal building – in visual form. This podcast addresses methodological approaches and challenges in researching ATBAT’s theoretical and concrete developments of habitat in Morocco before tracing the afterlives of these projects in adjacent Algeria, far-flung Cambodia, and ultimately returning to the Parisian suburbs at the end of the decade.

Johanna Sluiter is writing a dissertation on the Atelier des Bâtisseurs and the development of habitat in post-war architecture. She is currently an associate researcher at the École Normale Supérieure d’Architecture Belleville in Paris and a Chester Dale Fellow at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

TALIM Director John Davison moderated the discussion for this podcast, which was recorded on 21 February 2020, at the Tangier American Legation and Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM), in Tangier, Morocco. 


Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

The Arab Transformations Project

EPISODE 86

The Arab Transformations Project


In this podcast, Professor Andrea Teti discusses the findings of the Arab Transformations Project. Led by Aberdeen University, the project carried out public surveys in seven Arab countries in late 2014 and compiled a longitudinal database. According to the survey data, Professor Andrea Teti examines the economic, social and political transformations in the region. The survey observations indicate challenging popular perceptions in relation to a broad range of topics such as: corruption, youth, democracy, migration, gender, religion, security and stability, and Eu-MENA relations. 

The analysis of the surveys data shows that, contrary to popular belief, the 2011 Uprisings weren’t “youth revolution” but were rather carried out by protesters from all age groups and all sorts of social backgrounds. Data also reveals that people in the Arab world, have a holistic conception of democracy which extends its perception beyond narrow definitions based on free and fair elections to include both civil-political and socio-economic rights. Of all the factors associated with democracy, corruption is one of the most important variables that people are concerned with. In addition, the 2011 Uprisings provided a framework for examining issues that have been long linked to the Orientalist stereotypes about how the region is not suited to democracy, shifting attention to how effective the ongoing mass mobilization can be putting governments under pressure. The survey concludes that claims for both socio-economic and political inclusion are at the heart of the Arab Uprisings.

Andrea Teti is Associate Professor of International Relations at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. He is author of The Arab Uprisings in Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan: Social, Political and Economic Transformations (2018) with Pamela Abbott and Francesco Cavatorta, and his book Democratization Against Democracy: How the EU failed to learn from the Arab Uprisings with Pamela Abbott, Valeria Talbot and Paolo Maggiolini is forthcoming in 2020 by Palgrave.

CEMAT Director, Dr. Laryssa Chomiak, led this interview, which was recorded on June 20, 2019, at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).



Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Wednesday, 5 February 2020

No Country for Young Men

EPISODE 85

No Country for Young Men


In this podcast, Karim ZakhourPhD candidate in Political Science at Stockholm University focuses on the relationship between young men in the margins and the state in periods of transition. By looking at everyday experiences of the state, Zakhour argues that one aspect of the Tunisian democratic transition and the opening of the public sphere has been a widespread deconstruction of the state. Another aspect is the increased opportunity for viewing the failures of society and of the self. It is by no means the case that the young men only externalize their critical gaze; they also turn it inwards. This increased opportunities for, and expressions of, self-critique coexist with a widely noted and prevalent nostalgia for Bourguiba, Ben Ali, and ‘strong man’ leaders more generally. Zakhour attempts to understand young men’s ambivalent attitude towards the state; as both deconstructive and desired and seeks to understand how these seemingly contradictory tendencies coexist, but also how they feed each other. 

The interview is based on Karim Zakhour’s Doctoral research and fieldwork conducted in Kasserine and Gafsa. To that regard, he argues that it is only through an ethnographic approach that brings in the everyday that we can capture the complexities of state-citizen dynamics.

Karim’s other research interests include field methodology, political ethnography and the political economy of development.  

CEMAT Assistant Director, Dr. Meriem Guetat, led this interview which was recorded during the CEMAT Director’s Conference on “Narratives of Legitimacy and the Maghrebi State: Power, Law and Comparison” held on 21 June 2019 in Sidi BouSaid, Tunisia.



Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Wednesday, 29 January 2020

Algérie, une autre histoire de l’indépendance. Trajectoires révolutionnaires des partisans de Messali Hadj

EPISODE 84 

Algérie, une autre histoire de l’indépendance. Trajectoires révolutionnaires des partisans de Messali Hadj


Dans ce Podcast, Dr. Nedjib Sidi Moussa, Historien à l'université de Paris I, présente son dernier ouvrage Algérie, une autre histoire de l’indépendance. Trajectoires révolutionnaires des partisans de Messali Hadj (Barzakh, 2019).

Comment des Algériens sont-ils devenus révolutionnaires dès les années 1930 ? Et comment ont-ils mené leur révolution encore après 1962 ? Faire l'histoire du messalisme, expérience politique décisive en Algérie, consiste à révéler une autre histoire de l'indépendance.

En éclairant le parcours de ceux qui animèrent un courant réprimé par les autorités françaises et marginalisé par le FLN devenu hégémonique, cet ouvrage redonne vie au mouvement fondé par Messali Hadj, le pionnier malheureux du nationalisme algérien qui a émergé dans l'émigration ouvrière. Il interroge le legs colonial, la pluralité des engagements et les tensions mémorielles qui les traversent jusqu'à la période contemporaine.

À l'heure où le regard sur la guerre d'Algérie s'est renouvelé et alors que le destin politique du pays est en jeu, les racines messalistes de la démocratie algérienne apparaissent d'une grande actualité.

La conférence de Dr. Nedjib Sidi Moussa a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle de conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, histoire au Maghreb » organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA). Elle a eu lieu le 09 octobre 2019 au CEMA, Oran. Dr. Amar Mohand Amar, Chercheur permanent au CRASC a modéré le débat.


Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Nous remercions Dr. Tamara Turner, Ethnomusicologue et chercheur au Max Planck Institute for Human DevelopmentCentre for History of Emotions, pour son interprétation de Sidna Ali du répertoire du Diwan

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Wednesday, 22 January 2020

Alger, capitale de la révolution. De Fanon aux Black Panthers

EPISODE 83 

Alger, capitale de la révolution. De Fanon aux Black Panthers  



Dans ce podcast, Elaine Mokhtefi, auteur, présente son livre, Alger, capitale de la révolution. De fanon aux Black Panthers (Barzakh, 2019).

La trajectoire d’Elaine Mokhtefi, jeune militante américaine, a, dès la guerre d’Algérie et pendant deux décennies, épousé celle de la cause algérienne.

Ce combat la mène à New York, au siège des Nations unies avec la délégation du FLN ; à Accra, aux côtés de Frantz Fanon pour la conférence de l’Assemblée mondiale de la jeunesse ; à Alger, enfin, où elle atterrit en 1962, quelques semaines après l’indépendance. Elle y restera jusqu’en 1974. Journaliste, interprète et organisatrice efficace, elle assiste, remplie d’espoir, aux premiers pas de la jeune république, accueille les Black Panthers en exil et participe à mettre sur pied le Festival panafricain d’Alger. 

Ses mémoires témoignent de l’effervescence des luttes anticoloniales des années 1960, vécue dans l’intimité des grandes figures de l’époque – Ben Bella, Castro, Eldridge Cleaver –, dans une ville qui a gagné avec sa liberté des allures de capitale de la révolution mondiale. 

Une histoire fascinante, qu’Elaine Mokhtefi raconte avec une passion et une conviction intactes. 

Elaine Mokhtefi, issue d’une famille de la classe ouvrière américaine, est née en 1928 à New York. La lutte pour l’indépendance l’a conduite à vivre douze ans en Algérie où elle a travaillé comme journaliste et traductrice. Elle s’est mariée à un ancien membre de l’Armée de libération nationale algérienne (ALN) devenu écrivain, Mokhtar Mokhtefi, décédé en 2015, auteur de mémoires très remarqués J’étais Français-Musulman (Barzakh, 2016). 

La conférence d'Elaine Mokhtefi a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, histoire au Maghreb » co-organisé par Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre de Recherche en Anthropologie sociale et culturelle (CRASC).  Elle a eu lieu le 06 novembre 2019 au CRASC, Oran. Pr. Hassan Remaoun, chercheur associé, CRASC, a modéré le débat.


Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Nous remercions notre ami Ignacio Villalón, étudiant en master à l'EHESS, pour sa prestation à la guitare pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Thursday, 16 January 2020

The Monopoly of Criminal Justice and the Formulation of State-Society Relations in Morocco

EPISODE 82 

The Monopoly of Criminal Justice and the Formulation of State-Society Relations in Morocco 
 

In this podcast, Fatim-Zohra El Malki seeks to retrace the socio-legal history of Morocco’s criminal justice system and its impact on the formulation of state-society relations. El Malki argues that Morocco’s Penal Code (PC) can serve as a useful object of analysis for tracing how the Moroccan state used the criminal system to deepen and consolidate its power following independence. Through the historicization of the criminal system, El Malki aims to center the legal processes that contributed to the territorial construction and consolidation of what is now the Kingdom of Morocco. Rather than focusing on the trajectory of the codes and legal systems, this presentation is an attempt to understand the mechanisms of violence and repression embedded in the legal system across time, of which the penal code is only a fragment. This discussion unravels an enduring paradox: how the makhzen’s deepening authority and territorial expansion created a strong central state at the expense of the progressive alienation of the citizen from the central power. In relation to criminal justice, the makhzen’s monopoly over judicial power placed a chokehold on the sphere of checks and balances between the citizen and the central authority. The PC constitutes a space for the legal expression of political violence perpetrated by the state against society, bearing in mind that the violence of the law is not inevitably illegitimate nor unethical. The unbalanced interplay of power dynamics, which lead to the overwhelming monopoly of violence by the state is what constitutes the core of the argument that places the PC at the center of this space. El Malki argues that reforming the system today would mean transferring the discursive monopoly of violence outside this scope, therefore shaking the safeguarded equilibrium of power that the modern Moroccan state holds.

Fatim-Zohra El Malki is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research project revolves around the making of the criminal justice system in Morocco, with a particular focus on the Penal Code. Fatim-Zohra El Malki holds master’s degrees in Arab Studies from Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (2016) and in Security Studies from Queen's University of Belfast (2013). 

This podcast is part of the Contemporary Thought series and was recorded on 21 June 2019. at the  Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).



Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

We thank Dr. Tamara Turner, Ethnomusicologist and Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Center for the History of Emotions, for her interpretation of Natiro/ Ya Joro, from the Hausa repertoire of diwan.

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Wednesday, 8 January 2020

La socio-anthropologie rurale. Structure, organisation et changement au Maghreb

Episode 81 

La socio-anthropologie rurale. Structure, organisation et changement au Maghreb



Dans ce podcastPr. Hassan Rachik, Professeur d'anthropologie et Directeur du Centre Marocain des Sciences Sociales à l’Université Hassan II, Casablanca, Professeur visiteur dans des universités américaines, européennes et arabes, présente son dernier ouvrage Socio-anthropologie rurale : structure, organisation et changement au Maghreb (Editions la croisée des chemins, 2019).

Le milieu rural tient une place importante dans les sociétés maghrébines. Il est de plus en plus l’objet d’actions politiques et civiques visant sa domestication, son développement. Sur le plan académique, il a fait l’objet d’études socio-anthropologiques menées par d’éminents auteurs. Le présent livre vise à restituer et à examiner, de façon didactique, l’essentiel de ces études souvent négligées. Il comprend un texte théorique, proche d’un manuel critique, et un recueil de textes illustrant les principales questions soulevées. La partie théorique procède à de brèves synthèses, à des mises au point et à des évaluations critiques. Les entrées choisies s’imposent à toute étude et action engagées en milieu rural. Qu’on travaille sur le développement, l’approche participative, l’éducation, les élections, le rituel, ou tout autre phénomène, on est obligé d’avoir un minimum d’informations sur les structures et la stratification sociales des groupes concernés. On doit également avoir une idée sur la morphologie et l’organisation sociales, la place des individus dans la communauté. En rapport avec ces entrées théoriques, des textes de sociologues et d’anthropologues éminents maghrébins ou ayant travaillé sur le Maghreb sont choisis pour illustrer et approfondir les questions analysées. C’est une invitation à visiter les sources et à dépasser la lecture des textes de seconde main. 

Pr. Hassan Rachik a consacré ses premières recherches de terrain à l’interprétation des rituels et aux changements sociaux en milieu rural. Il s’est intéressé ensuite à l’étude des idéologies, aux processus d’idéologisation de la religion, et à la sociologie de la connaissance anthropologique. Auteur de plusieurs ouvrages dont Le sultan des autres, rituel et politique dans le Haut Atlas (1992)Comment rester nomade (2000)Symboliser la nation (2003)Le proche et le lointain. Un siècle d’anthropologie au Maroc (2012), L’esprit du terrain (2016), Éloge des identités molles (2016).

La conférence de Pr. Hassan Rachik a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Espaces et territoires au Maghreb » organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA). Elle a eu lieu le 27 novembre 2019 au CEMA.  Pr. Abdelkader Lakjaa, sociologue à l'Université d’Oran 2 a modéré le débat. 


Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Nous remercions notre ami Ignacio Villalón, étudiant en master à l'EHESS, pour sa prestation à la guitare pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA).

Wednesday, 18 December 2019

La Méditerranée aux yeux des géographes maghrébins au Moyen Âge

Episode 80 

La Méditerranée aux yeux des géographes maghrébins au Moyen Âge


Dans ce podcast, Dr. Boutheina Ben Hassine, Maître de conférences à la Faculté des Lettres et des Sciences humaines de Sousse et Cheffe d’atelier d'histoire médiévale au laboratoire « Occupation du sol, peuplement et modes de vie au Maghreb antique et médiéval », présente une communication portant sur la vision spécifique des géographes et voyageurs maghrébins sur la Méditerranée tout au long du Moyen Âge. Ces géographes ont fait une description des côtes de la partie occidentale et de la partie orientale. Le côté Est de la Méditerranée a été à l'origine de la marine et de la flotte islamique à l’époque de Mu’âwiya Ibn Abî Sufyân. Le savoir-faire maritime et la domination politique des Musulmans a été visible aux époques des dynasties aghlabide, fatimide et almohade. Les relations économiques entre la rive nord et la rive sud de la Méditerranée étaient très étroites à travers les ports d’al-Andalus, du Maroc, du Maghreb moyen et de l’Ifrîqiya.

Mme Ben Hassine est membre du conseil scientifique du laboratoire LR13ES11 et membre de la commission de l’agrégation. Elle a publié des livres sur l’histoire omeyyade et des articles sur les ibadites au Maghreb à l'époque médiévale. 

Ce podcast s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, Histoire au Maghreb ». Il a été enregistré durant le Workshop annuel de l’American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) à Sidi Bou Saïd en Tunisie le 20 et 21 juillet 2019 intitulé: La Méditerranée vue d'Afrique du nord  


Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Nous remercions infiniment Mohammed Boukhoudmi d'avoir interprété un morceau musical de Elli Mektoub Mektoub, pour les besoins de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Wednesday, 11 December 2019

Moroccan-American Archaeological Project of Ancient Sijilmasa

EPISODE 79

Moroccan-American Archaeological Project of Ancient Sijilmasa


In this podcast, Prof. James Miller, Emeritus Professor of Geography at Clemson University, discusses the joint Moroccan-American archaeological project at the site of Sijilmasa, and the publication of that projects findings, The Last Civilized Place: Sijilmasas and Its Saharan Destiny (University of Texas Press, 2015). Co-authored with project director Prof. Ronald Messier, Emeritus Professor of History at Middle Tennessee State University, the book places Sijilmasa in the context of Moroccan and Islamic history, revealing the 1,000-year history of the caravan center as a focus of trans-Saharan trade and focal point of dynastic change.

The podcast covers a wide variety of topics associated with Sijilmasa: its origins in the second century A.H. and the establishment of the Midrarid dynasty and their Sufri religious background, the significance of the surrounding irrigated oasis landscape of the Tafilalt, the unprotected nature of the site of Sijilmasa today, and the threats to it posed by the growth of the adjacent modern town of Rissani. The relations Sijilmasa long held with ancient Ghana and successor states south of the Sahara were rooted in the element of trade for which Sijilmasa was known far and wide from its earliest days, namely gold. Gold, African gold, was Sijilmasa’s fame, and the city and its caravans and commercial reach were the result of its long-held monopoly on the trans-Saharan gold trade.

Prof. Miller received his Ph.D. in cultural geography from the University of Texas at Austin and taught in the Department of History and Geography at Clemson University for 28 years. Upon retiring from Clemson, he became the Executive Director of the Moroccan-American Commission for Educational and Cultural Exchange (MACECE – Fulbright Morocco) in 2009 and retired from that position in 2018. He was President of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies from  2007 to 2010 and  has been Vice President since 2018. He serves on the boards of the Tangier American Legation and Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) and CorpsAfrica. Prof. Miller is the author of a number of works, including Imlil: A Modern Moroccan Geography (Westview, 1984) and A Question of Place (Wiley, 1989 - co-authored with Paul Ward).

TALIM Director John Davison moderated the discussion for this podcast, which was recorded on 30 September 2019, at TALIM, in Tangier, Morocco. 


Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

All Podcasts