Search This Blog

Translate

Facebook

Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Interview with Mieczysław Boduszyński

Episode 70

 Interview with Mieczysław Boduszyński on his recently published book, U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals  

In this podcast, Professor Mieczysław Boduszyński discusses his forthcoming book, U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals (Lynne Rienner, 2019), which looks at the place of democracy promotion in American foreign policy. Though a key pillar of U.S. foreign policy, democracy promotion is the subject of significant debate within and outside of policy-making circles, especially regarding why, where, when, and how the United State promotes democracy. 

In this podcast, Prof. Boduszyński looks at the temporal shift in U.S. support for the 2011 Arab Uprisings during the Obama administration - first supporting and later retreating from democracy promotion - highlighting the longstanding tension between interests and ideals in U.S. foreign policy. The podcast concludes with a discussion on the Trump administration's policy on democratic promotion and its relationship with regional autocrats. 

Mieczysław (Mietek) Boduszyński is Assistant Professor of Politics and International Relations at Pomona College in California, USA. He was previously a diplomat with the U.S. Department of State with postings in Albania, Egypt, Iraq, Japan, Kosovo, and Libya.

Professor Jacob Mundy of Colgate University, and current Visiting Fulbright Scholar in Tunisia, led the interview, which was recorded as part of the Contemporary Thought series on March 20th, 2019 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).



Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

We thank our friend Mohamed Boukhoudmi for his interpretation of the extract of "Nouba Dziriya" by Dr. Noureddine Saoudi for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Tuesday, 2 July 2019

Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces: Islam, Security, and Social Movements in Tunisia

Episode 69 

Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces: 
Islam, Security, and Social Movements in Tunisia

In this podcast, Dr. Tavis D. Jules is interviewed on his recent book, Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces : Islam, Security and Social Movements in Tunisia, co-authored with Dr. Teresa Barton. Jules and Barton trace the development of Tunisia’s educational system to the 2010/2011 contestatory events that led to the Tunisian Revolution and embarked on a period of large-scale institutional reform, including education sector reform. This post-Revolutionary reform has primarily been concerned with providing young Tunisian citizens with the necessary skills for a rapidly changing job market.  In his presentation, Jules engages with the issue of how a strong educational system produced generations of educated citizens, but whose most recent generation is frustrated by a weakened socio-economic system unable to absorb a young and educated workforce.  The book itself traces the history and evolution of Tunisia’s educational system since independence in 1956 to the contemporary period,  and ties its analysis to an « educational transitologies framework ». Through several chapters, the book engages and explores themes related to education, including security, gender, political Islam and social movements and analyses these comparatively pre- and post-political transition which commenced in 2011. 

In this podcast, Dr. Jules was invited to answer a number of questions touching upon the following themes : 
  • Definition of the concept of conscientization and its importance to understand the role of education.
  • The common link that the book draws between education and Islam, security and social movements. 
  • The book’s methodology to study 'educational transitologies' and what the example of Tunisia tells us about this theoretical framework. 
Dr. Tavis D. Jules is Associate Professor in Cultural and Educational Policy at Loyola University, specializing in Comparative and International Education. His research interests include, regionalism and governance, transitory spaces, and policy challenges in small island developing states (SIDS).

CEMAT Assistant Director Dr. Meriem Guetat, CEMAT led the interview, which was recorded as part of the Contemporary Thought series on December 13th, 2018 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).

Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

We thank the duo Ÿuma for use of their song, "Laya Snin", from their album Ghbar Njoum for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Thursday, 27 June 2019

Contrôler la Casbah: la police coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950

Episode 68 

Contrôler la Casbah: La police coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950



Dans ce Podcast, Danielle Beaujon, doctorante en histoire à New York University, présente une conférence dans le cadre de ses recherches doctorales qui portent sur la thématique suivante : Contrôler la Casbah: La Police Coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950.

La police coloniale a rempli plusieurs fonctions dans les villes méditerranéennes de Marseille et Alger. Ses agents ont servi à la fois comme exécuteurs répressifs de l’ordre colonial et comme intermédiaires recherchés. Dans cette présentation, Danielle Beaujon interroge le rapport quotidien entre les agents de la police coloniale et les Algériens dans les deux villes portuaires, Marseille et Alger entre 1920 et 1950. S'appuyant sur des documents d'archives, Danielle Beaujon a examiné la façon dont les hiérarchies coloniales, elles-mêmes en train d’être construites, ont influencé le contrôle des Algériens en métropole ainsi qu’en Algérie.
    La conférence de Danielle Beaujon a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, Histoire au Maghreb », co-organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre de Recherche en Anthropologie sociale et culturelle (CRASC). Elle a eu lieu le 16 juin 2019 au CRASC.  Dr. Amar Mohand Amar, Historien et Maître de recherche au CRASCa modéré le débat



    Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    Nous remercions infiniment Mohammed Boukhoudmi d'avoir interprété un morceau musical de Elli Mektoub Mektoub, pour les besoins de ce podcast.

    Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

    Thursday, 13 June 2019

    William Wordsworth and the French Revolution

    EPISODE 67

    William Wordsworth and the French Revolution


    Dr. Mounir Khélifa studied English at the Sorbonne and Yale University where he received his MA and PhD, respectively. A professor of English language and literature for more than three decades, he taught poetics, comparative literature, and literary theory at the University of Tunis. Former director of the graduate program in English, Dr. Khélifa was also a senior advisor to the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, where he was responsible for international cooperation and curriculum reform. Currently, Dr. Khélifa runs the School for International Training study-abroad program in Tunisia. He is a lifetime member of the Tunisian Academy for the Arts, Letters, and Sciences, Beit al-Hikma.

    William Wordsworth was the only English poet of his generation to have been an eyewitness to the French Revolution. To the momentous event he devoted no less than three books in his autobiographical epic poem, The Prelude.

    It is conventionally accepted that his relation to the revolution altered radically during the course of the events, and that this relation went from passionate enthusiasm at the storming of the Bastille to doubt and fear during the Reign of Terror to utter rejection and denial at the rise of Napoleon and during the ensuing Napoleonic Wars.    

    Yet even as this doxa accounts for the poet’s changing attitude towards the revolution, it fails to explain the complex emotional and intellectual processes that activated the change.  It fails mainly to consider that the change occurs in a poem designed to ratify “the growth of the poetic mind.”  Wordsworth has no pretense to be a historian. His recounting of the revolutionary events, he warns the reader, is justified only insofar as the events have been “storm or sunshine to [his] mind.” 

    Dr Mounir Khélifa argues that if the expression “storm and sunshine” refers to the aesthetic emotion known as the sublime (beauty that has terror in it, Edmund Burke), then this emotion never abated in him and that throughout his entire life he kept “daring sympathies with power” whenever he recalled the French Revolution.  

    This lecture was co-organised by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) and the École Normale Superieure d’Oran (ENS).

    This episode is part of the Arts & Literature in the Maghrib lecture series and was recorded on April 24th,  2019, at the École Normale Supérieure d’Oran (ENS).

    Pr. Sidi Mohamed Lakhdar Barka, Professor of Comparative Literature from the Department of English at University of Oran 2 moderated the lecture.


    Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    We thank Dr. Jonathan Glasser, Cultural Anthropologist at the College of William & Mary for his istikhbar in sika on viola for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

    Realization and editing:  Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    Monday, 3 June 2019

    Tuning in to Morocco’s “Recitational Revival”

    Episode 66

    Tuning in to Morocco’s “Recitational Revival”


    According to some religious leaders and other intellectuals, Morocco is in the midst of a 'recitational revival' (sahwa tajwidiyya). Though its scope and effectiveness are not yet clear, the intention is a re-emphasis on two core Islamic disciplines that relate to recitation of the Qur’an: first, tajwid, a system of rules that govern pronunciation and rhythm of the Qur’anic text in recitation performance; and the variance of those rules across seven, coherent, recitals or 'readings' (qira’at) that are equally sound. Within this revival, Moroccan’s historical preference for riwayat warsh, a lesser-practiced variant of one of the seven qira’at has become almost a point of national pride, and thus the Moroccan state has devoted many resources not only to specialist study of the qira’at, but also popularization of tajwid through mass media.

    Engaging fieldwork at a variety of institutions, including new and pre-existing schools and state radio, in this Podcast, Ian VanderMeulen, doctoral candidate in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, maps an institutional framework of this revival and describes some of its core elements. In particular, he compares and contrasts the work going on at two institutions of qira’at study, the state-funded Ma‘had Muhammad Assadiss lil-dirasat wal-qira’at al-Qur’aniyya in Rabat, and the private Madrasat Ibn al-Qadi lil-qira’at in Sale. Taking inspiration from the growing field of 'sound studies,' and grounding his fieldwork in historical research on tajwid, the qira’at, and the history of sound recording, Ian suggests that the sahwa tajwidiiyya is less a 'revival' of previous practices of recitation per se, but a refashioning of such practices and their pedagogies through the application of new technologies, from modern classroom whiteboards to digital studio recording.

    A performing musician, Ian holds bachelor’s degrees in music and religious studies from Oberlin College and an M.A. from The Graduate Center, City University of New York. His research in France and Morocco has been funded by NYU’s Graduate Research Initiative and the American Institute for Maghrib Studies.

    This podcast was recorded at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIMon February 7, 2019.
    Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    Thursday, 30 May 2019

    L'Oasis de Jemna en Tunisie, entre dissidence et négociation

    Episode 65

    L'Oasis de Jemna en Tunisie, entre dissidence et négociation


    Dans ce Podcast, Pr. Mohammed Kerrou, Professeur de sciences politiques à la Faculté de Droit et des Sciences Politiques de TunisUniversité de Tunis El-Manar présente une de ses enquêtes sur l'Oasis de Jemna. Située au Sud-Ouest tunisien, cette oasis est devenue dans le sillage de « la révolution de la dignité », le lieu d’exercice d’une citoyenneté libre et conviviale, par le biais de la récupération d’un ancien domaine agricole colonial (Henchir el-mâamer) devenu, au lendemain de l’indépendance nationale, domaine de l’Etat. Du coup, le conflit entre la légalité étatique et la légitimité de l’appropriation de la terre par les Oasiens offre l’opportunité d’un débat démocratique inédit. L’Association de protection des Oasis de Jemna, expression de la société civile locale, se trouve aujourd’hui en rapport de négociation avec les autorités en vue de la création d’une coopérative de production agricole. L’enjeu consiste dans la résistance en vue de réaliser l’objectif d’une économie sociale et solidaire, tout en maintenant la flamme de cette expérience innovante. Toutefois, une telle expérience court le risque, à l’instar de tous les mouvements de mobilisation collective, de l’étiolement progressif et de la banalisation par le système de reproduction inégalitaire, tant sur le plan social que régional, réduisant de la sorte l’expérience à un produit historique des marges, avec ce que cela implique comme processus de marginalisation et d’isolement des individus et des communautés périphériques.

     Pr Mohamed Kerrou est l'auteur de plusieurs ouvrages parmi lesquels : 
    La conférence de Pr. Mohammed Kerrou a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Espaces et territoires au Maghreb » co-organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre de Recherche en Anthropologie sociale et culturelle (CRASC) . Elle a eu lieu le 24 avril 2019 au CRASC.  Pr. Abdelkrim Elaidi, sociologue à l'Université d’Oran 2 a modéré le débat. 


    Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    Nous remercions Dr. Tamara Turner, Ethnomusicologue et chercheure à Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Center for the History of Emotions pour son interprétation de Sidna Boulal du répertoire Hausa du Diwan (Hausa Sug).

    Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

    Wednesday, 15 May 2019

    صناعة البحر المتوسط في المتخيلة الاسلامية، تصور المسلمين لمنطقة البحر المتوسط من خلال تاريخ الخرائط من القرن العاشر للقرن السادس عشر

    Episode 64

    صناعة البحر المتوسط في المتخيلة الاسلامية، تصور المسلمين لمنطقة البحر المتوسط من خلال تاريخ الخرائط من القرن العاشر للقرن السادس عشر

    (In Arabic)

    In this podcast, Dr. Tarek Kahlaoui presents his recent book, Creating the Mediterranean: Maps and the Islamic Imagination (Brill, 2017), in which he traces the depictions of the Mediterranean from from Islamic sources  dating between the 9th to the 16th century. During that span, he argues, the profession of map-makers shifted from bureaucratic authors to active mariners and professional cartographers, whereas the, from the dominance of the centers of the Islamic dominion in the eastern Islamic lands to the Maghrib. 

    Dr. Kahlaoui (Ph.D University of Pennsylvania, 2008) is currently an assistant professor at the South Mediterranean University (Tunisia). He was formerly an assistant professor at Rutgers University and the general director of the Tunisian Institute of Strategic Studies. His research focuses on Mediterranean history and visual culture. 


    Ms. Saliha Snouci, Researcher (CRASC), moderated the discussion.
      
    Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    We thank our friend Ignacio Villalón, Master candidate at EHESS, for his guitar performance for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

    Realization and editing:  Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    Wednesday, 17 April 2019

    Entretien avec Dr. Khadija Mohsen-Finan sur son dernier livre : Les Dissidents du Maghreb Depuis les indépendances

    Episode 63

    Entretien avec Dr. Khadija Mohsen-Finan sur son dernier livre: Les Dissidents du Maghreb Depuis les indépendances


    Dans ce podcast, Dr. Meriem Guetat , Directrice Adjointe du CEMAT, s’entretient avec Dr.  Khadija Mohsen-Finan sur son dernier livre Les Dissidents du Maghreb depuis les Indépendences.

    L’ouvrage de Dr. Khadija Mohsen-Finan est l’un des premiers travaux post-2011 qui s’intéressent au concept de la dissidence à travers le Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc, Tunisie) et qui se base sur une recherche rétrospective de longue durée. 

    Dans cet épisode, Dr. Mohsen-Finan souligne l’importance d’étudier l’histoire du Maghreb à travers le prisme de la dissidence, tout courants idéologiques confondus, ce qui constitue un renversement de la perspective traditionnelle de recherche se concentrant exclusivement sur le pouvoir. Selon Dr. Mohsen-Finan, il s’agit d’aborder une histoire méconnue du Maghreb qui permet de comprendre ses diffrentes évoultions historiques mais aussi d’interprèter et d’imaginer les développements politiques futures dans la région. 
    Lors de cette conversation, Dr. Mohsen-Finan a été invitée à répondre à un nombre de questions s’articulant autour des thèmes suivant :

    •     La définition de la notion de dissidence dans son ouvrage ainsi que le rapport du dissident au pouvoir. 
    •     Les moments phares de l’histoire du Maghreb qui décrivent au mieux le rapport de lutte entre le pouvoir et ses opposants et ce en concentrant sur le  moment Youssefiste et de l’affaire Ahmed Ben Salah.
    •     Le groupe « perspectives » en Tunisie et l’évolution de ses relations avec le pouvoir. 
    •     Le rôle des défenseurs des droits humains et le rôle joué par la LTDH dans l’analyse de la Tunisie.  
    •     Le printemps noir de Kabylie dans le cadre de la dissidence post-2011 et le rôle des minorités ethniques et linguistiques pour la compréhension de la notion de dissidence. 

    Dr. Khadija Mohsen-Finan est politologue spécialiste du Maghreb et du monde arabe, Docteur en sciences politiques (IEP Paris) et diplômée d’histoire (Université d’Aix-en-Provence). Actuellement enseignante et chercheure à l’Université de Paris 1 - Panthéon Sorbonne (laboratoire SIRICE), elle enseigne parallèlement à l’Université Ca’Foscari de Venise. Elle contribue également au comité de rédaction et à l’animation du journal en ligne Orient XXI.

    Cet épisode a été enregistré le 21 février 2019 au Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) et s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle de conférences Pensées contemporaines.



    Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    Nous remercions notre ami Mohammed Boukhoudmi pour son interpretation de l'extrait de nouba, "Dziriya," par Dr. Noureddine Saoudi pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.

    Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    Wednesday, 3 April 2019

    Le trauma colonial: enquête sur les effets de l’oppression coloniale en Algérie

    ÉPISODE 62 

    LE TRAUMA COLONIAL: ENQUÊTE SUR LES EFFETS DE L'OPPRESSION COLONIALE EN ALGÉRIE


    Dans ce podcast, Karima Lazali, psychologue clinicienne / psychanalyste, présente son livre, Le trauma colonial: enquête sur les effets de l’oppression coloniale en Algérie (Éditions Koukou, 2018).

    L’absence de travaux sur les effets psychiques de la colonisation en France et en Algérie, depuis Frantz Fanon, nous interpelle. Les effets du colonial relèvent-ils pour les deux sociétés d’une forme d’impensé à l’œuvre ? Malgré une forte présence dans les discours en Algérie de cet épisode de l’histoire, il n’empêche, que le recensement précis des problématiques dans les subjectivités et le social est resté lettre en souffrance. 

    A partir de sa pratique de la psychanalyse dans les deux sociétés et du constat freudien d’une étroite intrication entre l’individuel et le collectif, Karima Lazali va tenter d’entrer dans cet univers des mémoires ou l’archivage habituel fonctionne difficilement pour construire des récits pluriels et singuliers. La confiscation politique de l’histoire dans les deux sociétés mène à l’hypothèse que nous avons affaire à un pacte dans lequel l’effacement joue un rôle majeur pour fabriquer une mémoire brouillée.  

    Dans ce podcast, Lazali aborde donc quelques questions fondamentales :
    • Le rapport à la parole, aux peurs et aux censures dans la société contemporaine algérienne.
    • Comment les subjectivités et la structure du politique ont été façonnés par un tissage politique qui porte et reconduit le système colonial.
    • La fabrique de l’illégitimité individuelle et politique comme conséquences majeures de la colonisation
    • L’apport de la littérature algérienne pour traiter et soigner des déchirures du collectif et des subjectivités troublées dans la construction des traces mémorielles.
    • Et enfin si pour la psychanalyse il n’y a de trauma qu’individuel alors comment penser les déflagrations intimes d’une histoire collective ? Qu’est-ce que l’héritage à l’échelle du collectif ? Est-ce juste une manière passive de recevoir la destruction sur plusieurs générations ? Ou n’est-ce pas plutôt une façon d’écrire cette destruction quitte parfois à y participer durant de très nombreuses décennies ?  

    La conférence de Karima Lazali a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, histoire au Maghreb » organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA). Elle a eu lieu le 06 mars 2019 au CEMA.  Pr. Mohamed Mebtoul, sociologue, a modéré le débat. 


    Téléchargez le Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    Nous remercions Dr. Jonathan Glasser, anthropologue culturel au College of William & Mary, pour son istikhbar in sika à l'alto pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast. 

    Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

    Thursday, 21 March 2019

    Power and Ridicule: Political Mockery and Subversion in the Middle East and North Africa


    Episode 61

    Power and Ridicule: Political Mockery and Subversion in the Middle East and North Africa


    In this podcast, Prof. Charles Tripp discusses how humor and mockery are considered ways of resilience against power through the use of cartoons, songs, images, or any form of art to reveal the lies, hypocrisy of those in power.

    Prof. Tripp is Professor Emeritus of Politics with reference to the Middle East and North Africa at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and is a Fellow of the British Academy. His PhD was from SOAS and examined Egyptian politics in the latter years of monarchy. At SOAS he has been head of the Centre for Middle Eastern Studies and is one of the co-founders of the Centre for Comparative Political Thought. His research has mainly focused on political developments in the Middle East and includes the nature of autocracy, war and the state, as well as Islamic political thought, the politics of resistance and the relationship between art and power. He is currently working on a study of the emergence of the public and the rethinking of republican ideals in North Africa.

    This episode is part of the Contemporary Thought series and was recorded on February 14th, 2019 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).


    Download the Podcast:  Feed iTunes / Podbean

    We thank Mr. Souheib Zallazi, (student at CFTTunisia) and Mr. Malek Saadani (student at ULT, Tunisia), for their interpretation of el Ardh Ardhi of Sabri Mesbah, performed for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast. Souheib on melodica and Malek on guitar.

    Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    All Podcasts